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Survey of British Literature

Survey of British Literature

(Names/dates/literary terms)


 

Anglo-Saxon

 

1. Indo-European

2. IE migrations

3. Celtic

4. Latin

5. Germanic

6. A.D. 43

7. A.D. 449

8. A.D. 597 and

St. Augustine

9. Picts/Scots

10. Hadrian’s Wall

11. “Anglisch”

12. Angle-land

13. thorn/eth

14. 3 periods of English

language

15. language constants

16. A.D. 1066

17. Norman Conquest

18. inflections

19. features of Anglo-Saxon

20. William the Conqueror

21. Battle of Hastings

22. 1205

23. 1476

24. William Caxton

25. printing press

26. Great Vowel Shift

27. 1611

28. King James Bible

29. The Exeter Book

30. half-lines

31. caesura

32. alliteration

33. kennings

34. ubi sunt

35. Heorot Hall

36. Geats

37. Scyldings

 

 

38. ritual boasting

39. gold-giver, etc.

40. scop

41. wergild

42. Hrothgar

43. Wealtheow

44. Unferth

45. Breca

46. Aeschere

47. Hondscio

48. Hygelac

49. Hygd

50. Grendel

51. Grendel’s mother

52. Fire-breathing

Dragon

53. Wiglaf

54. thane

55. interest in

genealogy

56. Fate/wyrd

57. Fame

58. Hrunting

59. Naegling

60. “to harrow”

61. barrow

62. “peace-weaver”

 

Middle English

 

57. Thomas à Beckett

58. Canterbury

Cathedral

59. 1170

60. Henry II

61. theme of sickness

62. “mechanics” of the

CT (pilgrims, number of stories)

63. Southwark

64. The Tabard Inn

 

 

 

65. Harry Bailey

66. gullible narrator

67. ironic manipulation

language

68. rhyming couplets

69. iambic pentameter

70. descriptions of

pilgrims in Gen. Prol.

71. physiognomy

72. the four humours

73. jobs of clergymen

74. authority vs

experience

75. scriptural exegesis

76. a Romance

77. an exemplum

78. a fabliau

79. avarice

80. Radix malorum est

cupiditas

81. Amor vincit omnia

82. Questio quid juris

83. the Medieval

Romance (def.)

84. “prosody” of “Sir

Gawain and the

Green Knight”;

including:

85. the “bob”

86. the “wheel”

87. rhyme scheme of

bob and wheel

88. quatrain

89. Gawain’s pentangle

(the “5 fives”)

90. verisimilitude

91. setting of “Sir

Gawain (time/place)

92. use of superlatives

93. numerology (3 & 5)

94. Michaelmas

95. All Hallows Day

96. baldric/lace/sash/

girdle/weed

97. Gringolet

98. Pater/Ave/Credo

99. Bercilak de

Hautdesert

100. Morgain le Faye

101. Gawain and

Christian redemption

 

The Elizabethan Age

 

102. Elizabeth I

103. Elizabeth’s reign

(1558-1603)

104. comedy (“revel”)

105. tragedy

(“goatsong”)

106. exposition

107. conflict

108. complications

109. rising action

110. climax

111. falling action

112. catastrophe

113. denouement

114. resolution

115. catharsis

116. Aristotle’s desc. of

tragic hero

117. 1606

118. James VI/I

119. Holinshed’s

Chronicles

120. major themes of

Macbeth

121. setting of Macbeth

122. characters in

Macbeth

123. plot of Macbeth

124. “mac—”

125. “inver—”

126. place names in

Macbeth

127. composition date

of Macbeth

128. composition date

of Hamlet

129. revenge plays

130. Saxo Grammaticus

131. Historica Danica

132. setting of Hamlet

133. plot of Hamlet

134. soliloquy

135. aside

136. anachronism

137. 4 humours in

Hamlet

138. sonnet

139. Shakespearean

sonnet:

(3 quatrains & couplet)

140. Petrarchan sonnet:

(octave & sestet)

 

The Seventeenth Century

 

141. metaphysical

142. conceit

143. Dean of St. Paul’s

144. Ann More

145. “John Donne,

undone.”

146. James VI/I (1603-

1625)

147. the Stuart kings

148. Plymouth Bay

Colony (1620)

149. Massachusetts Bay

Colony (1629)

150. The Long

Parliament (1642)

151. The English Civil

War (began 1642)

152. Roundheads/

Parliamentarians

153. Royalists/Cavaliers

154. execution of

Charles I (1649)

155. the Interregnum

(1649-1660)

156. The Restoration

(1660)

157. Charles II (1660-

1685)

158. James II (1685-

1688-89)

159. The Glorious

Revolution (1688-

1689)

160. The Great Fire of

London (1666)

161. Jacobites

162. The Pretender

163. The Old Pretender

164. The Young

Pretender

165. The Grand Tour

166. 1652

167. Latin Secretary

168. Mary Powell

169. Katherine

Woodcock

170. Elizabeth Minshull

171. paradox

172. epigraph

173. epic conventions:

174. in media res

175. invocation to Muse

176. statement of

purpose or theme

177. hero whose

bravery, etc.

179. desc. of hero’s

weapon

180. battle in cosmos

181. gods participating

in action

182. serious tone

183. elevated diction

184. epic simile,

catalogue, ritual

185. blank verse

186. prosody

187. periodic sentence

 

 


The Eighteenth Century

 

188. conventions of satire:

189. distancing of time/place

190. citation of authority:

191. “experts” as authority

192. “numbers” as authority

193. stock characters:

194. “the gullible narrator”

195. episodic plot

196. manipulation of language:

197. punning/plays on words

198. names taking on significance

199. “outrageous comparisons”

200. use of irony:

201. understatement

202. overstatement/hyperbole

203. ironic juxtaposition

204. definition of satire

205. targets of satire

206. Juvenalian satire

207. Horatian satire

208. Pope as verse satirist

209. Swift as prose satirist

210. “epithets” of the 18th c.:

211. Age of Reason

212. The Enlightenment

213. The Augustan Age

214. The Neoclassical Age

215. The Age of Satire

216. The Age of Pope

217. The Age of Swift

218. The Age of Revolution

219. The Age of the Encyclopedia

220. Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral

221. “posthumous child”

222. “Quinbus Flestrin”

223. 1726

224. setting of Gulliver’s Travels

225. “High Heels/Low Heels”

226. “Big Endians/Little Endians”

227. logical arguments in “A Modest Proposal”

228. use of livestock/animal diction

229. “The Wicked Wasp of Twickenham”

 

 

230. heroic couplets

231. closed heroic couplet

232. open heroic couplet

233. Hampton Court Palace

234. epic conventions:

235. (see #s174-185)

 

The Pre-Romantics

 

236. elegy

237. Stoke Poges

238. dialect as determined by:

239. geography

240. social class

241. education.

242. dialect as choices made in:

243. diction (vocabulary)

244. pronunciation (accent)

245. syntax (word order)

246. grammatical habit

247. Lowland Scots/Lallans

248. Ayr/Ayrshire

249. Alloway

250. personification of abstractions

251. Innocence

252. Experience

253. Organized Innocence

254. Northrup Frye

255. Jerusalem

256. unity/disunity

257. fall into division

258. restored vision of universal

brotherhood

259. Jeremy Bentham

260. Benthamite Philosophy

261. Utilitarianism

262. Poor Law Amendment Act (1834)

263. “The Dietary”

264. “The New Poor Law”

 

 

 

 

Romanticism

 

265. “old date”: 1798-1832

266. “new date”: 1785-1830

267. 1789 (French Revolution)

268. 1795 (“First Generation Romantic Poets,” Ww. & Shelley meet)

269. The Lake District

270. Dove Cottage

271. Rydal Mount

272. Grasmere

273. Dorothy Wordsworth

274. Mary Hutchinson

275. 1843 (Ww. appointed Poet Laureate)

276. Annette Vallon

277. Caroline Vallon

278. “natural piety”

279. “pre-existence of the soul”

280. “What is poetry?”

281. “What is the language of poetry?”

282. “What is the subject matter of poetry?”

283. Silas Tomkyn Comberbache

284. Robert Southey

285. Pantisocracy

286. Sara Fricker

287. laudanum

288. Dr. James Gilman

289. elements, outlooks, concerns of Romanticism vs Neoclassicism

290. ballad form of Rime:

291. ballad stanza

292. quatrians rhyming abcb

293. violent subject matter

294. loss on a national scale

295. dialogue

296. repetition

297. use of supernatural.

298. frame device

299. “border ballads”

300. “Child ballads”

301. medieval folk ballads

302. “Second Generation” Romantics

303. Aeolian harp

304. The Pisan Circle

305. The Elgin Marbles

306. Harriet Westbrook

307. “The Necessity of Atheism”

308. William Godwin

309. Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin

310. Claire Clairmont

311. Art as immutable

312. “Beauty is truth, truth beauty.”

313. Truth = Immutable thing (Ww.)

314. Immutable thing = Art

315. Art = Truth (??)

316. Hampstead Heath

317. Fanny Brawne

318. 1819 (Keats’ annus mirabilis)

 

The Victorian Age

 

319. Charles Lyell

320. Principles of Geology (1833)

321. Charles Darwin

322. On the Origin of Species

323. 1833 (death of A.H.H.)

324. 1850 (Tennyson appointed Poet Laureate)

325. Poems by Two Brothers

326. Charles Tennyson

327. the Rev. Dr. George Tennyson

328. the “Apostles”

329. 1884 (Tennyson’s peerage by Queen Victoria)

330. the “In Memoriam stanza”:

331. iambic tetrameter lines

332. abba rhyme scheme

333. “short, swallow-flights of song”

334. Wimpole Street 

335. September 15, 1833

336. November, 1833

337. January 3, 1834

338. February 1

339. 3 Christmases

340. Vienna, Austria

341. Emily Tennyson

342. Trinity College, Cambridge

343. “the Bar”

344. the Crimean War

345. “occasional poems”

346. “the little Portugese”

347. Aurora Leigh

348. dramatic monologues

349. Men and Women

350. Dramatis Personae

351. The Oxford Movement

352. John Henry, Cardinal Newman

353. the Jesuit Order

354. sprung rhythm

355. inscape

356. instress

357. characteristics of Hopkins’ poetry:

358. alliteration

359. assonance

360. consonance

361. disruption of conventional syntax

362. ellipsis

363. coining words

364. compounding words.

365. Robert Bridges

366. 1918 (pub. of Hopkins’ poetry)

367. Wessex/Casterbridge

368. Dorset/Dorchester

369. Emma Lavinia Gifford & Florence Dugdale

370. Max Gate

371. A Shropshire Lad

 

(Edwardian Period [1901-1910])

 

(Georgian Period [1910-1914])

 

The War Poets

 

372. 1914-1918: World War I

373. “The Great War”

374. Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.

375. “The Old Lie”

376. colloquial diction

 

 

Modernism

 

377. stream-of-consciousness narrative technique

378. To the Lighthouse

379. “The Bloomsbury Group”

380. Leonard Woolf

381. The Hogarth Press

382. Sir Leslie Stephen

383. Maud Gonne

384. The Easter Rising

385. A Vision

386. Vivienne Haigh-Wood &

Valerie Fletcher

387. 1922: pub. of The Waste Land

388. 1927: T.S. Eliot becomes British subject and joins Anglican Church

389. epigraph

390. Ezra Pound

391. “a heap of broken images”

392. epiphany

393. 1914: pub. of Dubliners

394. 1922: pub. of Ulysses

395. 1939: pub. of Finnegan’s Wake

396. quay

397. River Liffey

398. University College, Dublin (“UCD”)

399. Trinity College, Dublin (“TCD”)

400. “Bloom’s Day”: June 16, 1904

401. isolato

402. 1939-1945: World War II

 

Postmodernism

403. “theatre of the absurd”

404. concrete/visual poetry

 

Additional Literary Terminology

 

405. allusion

406. oxymoron

407. paradox

408. personification

409. epigram, epigraph, epitaph

410. ode


Topics for short-answer/discussion questions:

 

1. uses of understatement in two or three works of satire (or overstatement)

 

2. the influence of the French Revolution/democratic ideals on the works of Blake, Wordsworth, and/or Shelley

 

3. an issue of “common concern” for both a Victorian writer of prose and a writer of poetry

 

4. irony as “The English Disease”

 

5. What makes “Modern poets” modern? (themes and/or poetic techniques)

 

6. importance of nature for Romantics, Victorians, and Modern poets

 

7. importance of childhood

 

8. evolving ideas about religion/religious belief

 

9. relationship for some poets of literature and the visual arts

 

10. influence by the classics on writers studied in the course

 

11. advances in science or natural philosophy as a “contributor to human progress, evidence of God’s universal plan, and/or a threat to religion”

 

12. themes of loneliness and isolation and antidotes to that loneliness

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